Basal ganglia dysfunction in Tourette's syndrome: a new hypothesis
by
Mink JW.
Department of Neurology,
Washington University School of Medicine,
St. Louis, MO 63110, USA. s
Pediatr Neurol2001 Sep;25(3):190-8


ABSTRACT

Tourette's syndrome is a neuropsychiatric syndrome with onset in childhood that is characterized by chronic multiple tics. The cause of Tourette's syndrome is unknown, but the pathophysiology most likely involves basal ganglia and frontocortical circuits. A useful scheme of basal ganglia dysfunction should be able to account for the features that make Tourette's syndrome unique, in addition to the features that Tourette's syndrome shares with other disorders. Recent advances in knowledge of basal ganglia functional anatomy and physiology make it possible to hypothesize how specific neural mechanisms relate to specific clinical manifestations of Tourette's syndrome. A model of selection and suppression of competing behaviors by the basal ganglia is presented. The functional anatomy of basal ganglia circuits and new information on dopamine modulation of those circuits provide the basis for hypotheses of basal ganglia dysfunction in Tourette's syndrome.
D1
Genes
Reward
Structure
Selegiline
Roxindole
Dopamine
Amineptine
Pramipexole
Bromocriptine
Methylphenidate
Tranylcypromine
Drugs and reward
Dopamine and sex
The dopamine transporter
Dopamine knock-out mice
The pleasure and the pain
Drugs for Tourette's syndrome


Refs
and further reading

HOME
HedWeb
Nootropics
erythroxylum-coca.com
Future Opioids
BLTC Research
MDMA/Ecstasy
Superhapiness?
Utopian Surgery?
The Abolitionist Project
The Hedonistic Imperative
The Reproductive Revolution
Critique of Huxley's Brave New World

The Good Drug Guide
The Good Drug Guide

The Responsible Parent's Guide
To Healthy Mood Boosters For All The Family