Use of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) reuptake
inhibitors in the treatment of alcoholism

by
Lejoyeux M
Department of Psychiatry,
Groupe Hospitalier Bichat Claude Bernard,
Paris, France.
Alcohol Alcohol Suppl 1996 Mar; 1:69-75


ABSTRACT

Animal studies have shown that alcohol consumption is reduced when serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) levels are increased in the central nervous system. Similarly, studies of alcohol-dependent human subjects have shown that treatment with 5-HT reuptake inhibitors (i.e. zimeldine, citalopram, fluoxetine, and fluvoxamine) decreases the desire to drink alcohol and improves symptoms of alcohol-related anxiety and depression in patients who have undergone detoxification. However, not all studies have shown them to be an effective treatment to help maintain recovery in alcohol dependence. The exact mechanisms of action of the 5-HT reuptake inhibitors are not yet fully understood and additional studies are needed. However, at this time, the 5-HT reuptake inhibitors may be effective pharmacotherapies for alcohol-related depression.
SSRIs
Options
Alcohol
Serotonin
Sertraline
Fluoxetine
Paroxetine
Citalopram
Fluvoxamine
Moderate drinking
Drugs for alcoholics
The motivation for beer
Ethyl alcohol and suicide
Tryptophan and alcoholism
Nicotine-ethanol interaction
Alcohol, alcoholism and GABA(A) receptors


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