Salvia divinorum: an hallucinogenic mint
which might become a new recreational drug in Switzerland

by
Giroud C, Felber F, Augsburger M,
Horisberger B, Rivier L, Mangin P
Laboratoire de Toxicologie Analytique,
Institut Universitaire de Medecine Legale,
rue du Bugnon 21, 1005,
Lausanne, Switzerland
Forensic Sci Int 2000 Aug 14;112(2-3):143-150


ABSTRACT

Salvia divinorum Epling & Jativa is an hallucinogenic mint traditionally used for curing and divination by the Mazatec Indians of Oaxaca, Mexico. Young people from Mexican cities were reported to smoke dried leaves of S. divinorum as a marijuana substitute. Recently, two S. divinorum specimens were seized in a large-scale illicit in-door and out-door hemp plantation. Salvinorin A also called divinorin A, a trans-neoclerodane diterpene, was identified in several organic solvent extracts by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The botanical identity of the plant was confirmed by comparing it to an authentic herbarium specimen. More plants were then discovered in Swiss horticulturists greenhouses. All these data taken together suggest that many attempts exist in Switzerland to use S. divinorum as a recreational drug. This phenomenon may be enhanced because neither the magic mint, nor its active compound are banned substances listed in the Swiss narcotic law.
DMT
5-HT
MDMA
Serotonin
Mescaline
Psilocybin
Salvinorin-A
Psychedelics
Cannabinoids
Salvia Divinorum
Benzodiazepines
LSD and dopamine
Drug discrimination
MAOIs and hallucinogens
Nexus, cathinone, BDB, and MDA
Salvia Divinorum and Salvinorin A


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