The clinical pharmacologic profile of reboxetine: does it involve the putative neurobiological substrates of wellbeing?
Healy D, Healy H
Institute for Medical and Social Care Research,
University of Wales, Bangor, UK.
J Affect Disord 1998 Dec; 51(3):313-22


Following a review of the clinical trials of reboxetine, a new nonadrenegic reuptake inhibitor antidepressant, this paper presents a heuristic theoretical framework to better understand selective antidepressant action. For over three decades, the dominant views of antidepressant action have seen these agents active across all constitutional types and regardless of social setting. An increasing number of studies using quality of life methods are at odds with this view. This paper summarizes several of these studies, along with two studies of the effects of reboxetine on the quality of life, which reveal differential effects of selective agents that demand alternative explanations to the conventional monoamine theories. The authors submit that any revisions in our understanding of what is happening will have to pay attention to temperamental inputs that antedate affective episodes and to the sense of wellbeing and level of residual symptoms patients have on treatment after the acute phase of their illness has remitted. Obviously much more research needs to be done in this area. This invited paper sketches out, in very general terms, some provocative possibilities of how future understanding of antidepressants, temperament and their neurobiologic substrates could lead to better matching of specific antidepressants to specific temperament types.

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