Quetiapine: efficacy and tolerability in schizophrenia
by
Kasper S, Tauscher J, Heiden A.
Department of General Psychiatry,
University of Vienna,
Wahringer Gurtel 18-20, A-1090,
Vienna, Austria
Eur Neuropsychopharmacol 2001 Oct;11 Suppl 4:S405-13


ABSTRACT

Quetiapine, in common with clozapine, has a greater affinity for 5-HT(2) receptors than D(2) receptors and preclinical studies have consistently predicted efficacy against schizophrenia, with a low potential for causing extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS). In clinical trials, the efficacy of quetiapine was consistently superior to placebo and it was effective against both positive and negative symptoms. Quetiapine was also at least as effective as chlorpromazine or haloperidol in improving the symptoms of acute schizophrenia and moreover was associated with higher response rates. The consistent, placebo-level incidence of EPS associated with quetiapine in clinical trials was not seen with haloperidol. Thus, the combination of efficacy comparable to other antipsychotic agents, with an acceptable side effect and tolerability profile, provides support for the use of quetiapine as a first-line antipsychotic agent in the long-term treatment of schizophrenia.
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