Pergolide: an antidepressant
adjuvant for mood disorders?

by
Bouckoms A, Mangini L
Hartford Hospital, CT 06115.
Psychopharmacol Bull 1993; 29(2):207-11


ABSTRACT

Pergolide, a dopamine (DA) agonist, can be a useful adjunct to antidepressant pharmacotherapy, both with tricyclic antidepressants and with monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs). Pergolide improved or very much improved (as measured by the Clinical Global Impressions Global Improvement Scale) 11 of 20 previously refractory unipolar and bipolar patients. Patients typically described an improvement in their mood, interest, and energy within a week. The range of effective dosage is from 0.25 mg to 2 mg, typically 0.5 mg to 1 mg. Pergolide does not work alone. There must be a concomitant antidepressant, either MAOI or non-MAOI type. Nausea and vomiting are sometimes treatment-limiting side effects. Hypomania is a risk but is quickly and permanently reversible by lowering the pergolide dose. The treatment implication for the future is that potent DA agonists such as pergolide may have a role as antidepressant adjuvants. This possibility is in contrast to the negative impressions of weaker DA agonists used alone.
Recovery
Pergolide
Rotigotine
Selegiline
Roxindole
Dopamine
Ropinirole
Amineptine
Pramipexole
Nomifensine
Bromocriptine
Thyroid hormones
Parkinson's disease
Methylphenidate SR
Dopamine and depression
Pramipexole and dopamine D3 receptors
Dopamine and dopaminergic antidepressants

Refs
and further reading

HOME
HedWeb
Nootropics
Cocaine.org
Future Opioids
BLTC Research
MDMA/Ecstasy
Superhapiness?
Utopian Surgery?
The Abolitionist Project
The Hedonistic Imperative
The Reproductive Revolution
Critique of Huxley's Brave New World

The Good Drug Guide
The Good Drug Guide

The Responsible Parent's Guide
To Healthy Mood Boosters For All The Family