Minor depression in primary care
by
Banazak DA.
Department of Psychiatry,
Michigan State University,
East Lansing, MI 48824, USA. banazak@msu.edu
J Am Osteopath Assoc 2000 Dec;100(12):783-7


ABSTRACT

Minor depression is defined as a mood disturbance of at least 2 weeks' duration, with between two and five symptoms of depression, including depressed mood, diminished interest, weight change, sleep disturbance, psychomotor changes, fatigue, feelings of worthlessness, poor concentration, and recurrent thoughts of death. Patients with this condition may have fewer vegetative symptoms (appetite, diurnal mood variation) and more subjective symptoms (self-blame, worry, irritability, lethargy). Minor depressive disorder is more prevalent in primary care than major depressive disorder. Failure to adequately treat this condition may have far-reaching impact on the health, functional status, quality of life, and cost of care for patients who have it. The notion that minor depression requires minor treatment is misleading. Cognitive-behavioral modes of therapy and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants have demonstrated efficacy for primary care patients who have minor depression.
TCAs
SSRIs
RIMAs
Options
Bupropion
Amineptine
Reboxetine
Mechanisms
Nefazodone
Mirtazapine
Venlafaxine
5-HT/dopamine
Antidepressants
Tranylcypromine
Chronic depression
Atypical depression
Retarded depression
Treatment-resistant depression
The monoamine theory of depression

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