Reversal of stress-induced deficit in
aggression by monoamine oxidase inhibitors

by
Ossowska G, Klenk-Majewska B, Danilczuk Z,
Wrobel A, Zebrowska-Lupina I
Department of Clinical Pharmacology,
Medical University School,
Lubin, Poland.
Pol J Pharmacol 1999 Sep-Oct; 51(5):391-7


ABSTRACT

In the present study we investigated the effect of two monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors: moclobemide (selective, reversible inhibitor of MAO-type A) or selegiline (selective irreversible inhibitor of MAO-type B) on electric footshock-induced fighting behavior in normal (unstressed) and chronically stressed (14 various stressors over 16 days) rats. In rats exposed to chronic stress the number of fighting attacks was reduced by about 75%. Prolonged (once a day, for 14 days) treatment with moclobemide (50 mg/kg/day) or selegiline (2 mg/kg/day) counteracted the deficit in aggression induced by chronic stress. The findings of the present study demonstrate that the selective MAO inhibitors, moclobemide and selegiline, protect against "behavioral depression" induced by the chronic stress similarly to other classes of antidepressant drugs.
MAO
RIMAs
MAOIs
Reward
TV3326
Phenelzine
Befloxatone
Brofaromine
Moclobemide
Isocarboxazid
The MAOI Diet
Tranylcypromine
MAO interactions
The Warrior Gene
New antidepressants
Stress and aggression
Genetic variation in MAO-A and human personality


Refs
and further reading

HOME
HedWeb
Nootropics
erythroxylum-coca.com
Future Opioids
BLTC Research
MDMA/Ecstasy
Superhapiness?
Utopian Surgery?
The Abolitionist Project
The Hedonistic Imperative
The Reproductive Revolution
Critique of Huxley's Brave New World

The Good Drug Guide
The Good Drug Guide

The Responsible Parent's Guide
To Healthy Mood Boosters For All The Family