Generalized anxiety disorder:
comorbidity, comparative biology and treatment

by
Nutt DJ, Ballenger JC, Sheehan D, Wittchen HU.
School of Medical Sciences, University of Bristol, UK
Int J Neuropsychopharmacol 2002 Dec;5(4):315-25


ABSTRACT

Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is a severe and chronic anxiety disorder characterized by uncontrollable worrying and somatic anxiety (tension, insomnia and hypervigilance). It is a common condition, with lifetime prevalence rates for DSM-IV GAD in the general population of approx. 5-6% being reported. In addition, like other anxiety disorders, GAD also shows comorbidity with depression and most of the other anxiety disorders. This article reviews data on the prevalence of GAD, its comorbidity with depression, and its social and economic impact. Proposed neurobiological mechanisms for GAD are discussed, since an understanding of these may help in the development of future therapies. Finally, current pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment options for GAD are reviewed, with particular attention being paid to published clinical-trial data.
GAD
SSRIs
Stress
F11440
Gepirone
Buspirone
Alprazolam
Adinazolam
Barbiturates
Benzodiazepines
Future anxiolytics
Venlafaxine for GAD
Drugs for treating GAD
Anxiety and depression
Subthreshold syndromes
Buspirone plus venlafaxine
Anxiolytics/antidepressants
Generalised Anxiety Disorder (GAD)
Anxiety and anxioselective anxiolytics
Pregabalin: its efficacy, safety and tolerability profile in generalized anxiety


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