Dopamine D2, D3 and D4 receptor and transporter
gene polymorphisms and mood disorders

by
Manki H, Kanba S, Muramatsu T, Higuchi S,
Suzuki E, Matsushita S, Ono Y, Chiba H,
Shintani F, Nakamura M, Yagi G, Asai M
Department of Neuropsychiatry,
Keio University School of Medicine,
Tokyo, Japan.
J Affect Disord 1996 Sep 9; 40(1-2):7-13


ABSTRACT

Disturbances in dopaminergic systems have been implicated in the etiology of mood disorders. Although genetic factors also play an important role, no major gene has been identified. We conducted an association study using the dopamine D2, D3 and D4 receptor, and transporter gene polymorphisms, comparing 101 mood-disorder patients (52 bipolar and 49 unipolar) and 100 controls. Our results suggest that there is a significant association between the dopamine D4 receptor gene and mood disorders, especially major depression, but no association between the other polymorphisms and mood disorders. Further investigations are needed to clarify the clinical significance of this association in the pathophysiology of mood disorders.
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