Effects of clorazepate, diazepam, and oxazepam
on a laboratory measurement of aggression in men

by
Weisman AM, Berman ME, Taylor SP.
Institute of Psychiatry, Law and Behavioral Science,
University of Southern California School of Medicine,
Los Angeles, USA. Int Clin Psychopharmacol 1998 Jul;13(4):183-8


ABSTRACT

The effects of three benzodiazepines on human aggressive behavior were examined in 44 medically healthy men. Volunteers were administered either placebo, 10 mg diazepam, 15 mg chlorazepate, or 50 mg oxazepam orally using double-blind procedures. Approximately 90 min after drug ingestion, participants were given the opportunity to administer electric shocks to an increasingly provocative fictitious opponent during a competitive reaction-time task. Aggression was defined as the level of shock the participant was willing to administer to the opponent. Results support the notion that diazepam (but not all benzodiazepines) can elicit aggressive behavior under controlled, laboratory conditions. Implications regarding the clinical use of various benzodiazepines for the tranquilization of potentially assaultive patients are discussed.
GABA
Anxiety
Valerian
Gepirone
Buspirone
Sedatives
Diazepam
Zopiclone
Triazolam
Fengabine
Midazolam
Alprazolam
Aggression
Temazepam
Barbiturates
Methaqualone
Benzodiazepines
Clorazepate, anxiety and mood

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