Early clinical neurochemistry of
CNS-active drugs. Chloral hydrate

by
Sourkes TL. Department of Psychiatry, McGill University,
Faculty of Medicine, Montreal, Canada.
Mol Chem Neuropathol 1992 Aug;17(1):21-30


ABSTRACT

Chloral hydrate was introduced into therapeutics more than 120 years ago, and soon became popular as a somnifacient. It is the first synthetic CNS depressant. Its metabolite, urochloralic acid, was detected early. Studies of the biochemical pharmacology of chloral hydrate have engaged the attention of many investigators in succeeding years. Its mode of action in producing sleep was initially attributed to the possibility that it gives rise to chloroform in vivo. Although this hypothesis did not stand up to scientific scrutiny, it led to efforts to establish how chloral hydrate brings about its action. This seems to be through its reduced metabolite, trichloroethanol. The precise mode of action on the nervous system remains to be worked out.

TCAs
SSRIs
NARIs
RIMAs
Options
Mechanisms
SSRIs/SNRIs
21st Century
Neurotrophins
Chloral hydrate
Future anxiolytics
Drugs for depression
Future pharmacotherapies
Chloral hydrate and the web
Anaesthesia and anaesthetics
Refs
and further reading

HOME
HedWeb
Nootropics
erythroxylum-coca.com
Future Opioids
BLTC Research
MDMA/Ecstasy
Superhapiness?
Utopian Surgery?
The Abolitionist Project
The Hedonistic Imperative
The Reproductive Revolution
Critique of Huxley's Brave New World

The Good Drug Guide
The Good Drug Guide

The Responsible Parent's Guide
To Healthy Mood Boosters For All The Family