Antidepressants and breast-feeding:
a review of the literature

by
Dodd S, Buist A, Norman TR
Department of Psychiatry,
University of Melbourne,
Austin & Repatriation Medical Centre,
Heidelberg, Australia
Paediatr Drugs 2000 May-Jun; 2(3):183-92


ABSTRACT

For every antidepressant so far investigated in the breast milk of mothers prescribed these medications, findings indicate that some amount of drug will be excreted into the breast milk. Nursing infants will be exposed to some, usually a very low, amount of drug and drug metabolites. Levels of drug exposure to infants for the many antidepressants available are examined, discussing milk to plasma drug concentration ratios and the infant dose as a percentage of the maternal dose. Drug concentrations in infant plasma and adverse effects of drug exposures to infants are reviewed. Factors influencing the decision on whether to breast or bottle feed an infant nursed by a mother taking antidepressants are discussed, concluding that the decision needs to be made on an individual basis. The lactating mother, in consultation with her doctor, should be in a position to make an informed decision on whether or not to breast feed. Under certain circumstances the decision to bottle feed may be wise, but more commonly the advantages of breast-feeding will outweigh the very low risk of an adverse event from drug exposure to the infant.
TCAs
SSRIs
Options
Estrogen
Fluoxetine
Imidazoline
Cortisol blues
SSRIs and PMT
Sertraline and PMT
Fluoxetine and PMT
Tryptophan and PMT
Alpha2 adrenoreceptors
Pregnancy and depression
Antidepressants and pregnancy


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