Columbia atypical depression. A subgroup of depressives with better
response to MAOI than to tricyclic antidepressants or placebo

by
Quitkin FM, Stewart JW, McGrath PJ, Tricamo E, Rabkin JG,
Ocepek-Welikson K, Nunes E, Harrison W, Klein DF.
New York State Psychiatric Institute, NY.
Br J Psychiatry Suppl. 1993 Sep;(21):30-4


ABSTRACT

We summarise a series of studies using a MAOI to help establish the validity of a subgroup of depressives referred to as atypical depressives. Patients with reactive mood meeting DSM-III criteria for depressive illness who had associated atypical features (which include hyperphagia, hypersomnolence, leaden paralysis, and rejection sensitivity) were randomised to imipramine, phenelzine and placebo. Non-responders were crossed over, and in all there were over 400 patient trials. Phenelzine consistently was found to be superior to imipramine. Only in trials which included patients lacking atypical, vegetative symptoms was imipramine found to equal phenelzine. We conclude that the researcher and the clinician should consider the relevance of the atypical depressive syndrome.
TCAs
SSRIs
MAOIs
Options
Recovery
Bupropion
Reboxetine
Nefazodone
Mirtazapine
Venlafaxine
Depressive realism
Atypical depression
Retarded depression
New antidepressants
Depression without sadness
Oversleeping and overeating
Atypical depression: treatment
The atypical subtype of depression
Atypical depression and personality
Atypical depression and noradrenaline
Atypical depression and soft bipolarity


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