Antisense oligonucleotides in psychopharmacology
and behaviour: promises and pitfalls

by
Robinson ES, Nutt DJ, Jackson HC, Hudson AL
Psychopharmacology Unit,
School of Medical Sciences, Bristol, UK.
J Psychopharmacol 1997; 11(3):259-69


ABSTRACT

Antisense oligonucleotides are used to study the expression and function of a diverse range of proteins. Areas for which antisense has been used for pharmacological investigation include receptors, neuropeptides and immediate early genes, particularly when specific ligands or markers are not yet available. Antisense oligonucleotides target a specific mRNA and block the expression of the protein by sequence specific hybridization. This technique has not only been shown to be a valuable pharmacological tool but also to have potential therapeutic applications. In this review we discuss the technology behind the technique including developments in methodology employed in antisense experiments. Although antisense provides a novel and highly specific tool, the reliability of the technique and many of the problems associated with antisense experiments are discussed. The main focus of this article is the use of antisense in psychopharmacology to investigate behavioural changes following antisense-mediated inhibition of the expression of specific brain proteins and receptors.

CRF
SSRIs
NARIs
1990s
RIMAs
Options
SNAP-7941
SSRIs/SNRIs
Somatostatin
Sigma ligands
Neurotrophins
Antidepressants
New antidepressants
Neurokinins/substance P
Future pharmacotherapies
Mood enhancement via stem cell therapy

Refs
and further reading

HOME
HedWeb
Nootropics
erythroxylum-coca.com
Future Opioids
BLTC Research
MDMA/Ecstasy
Superhapiness?
Utopian Surgery?
The Abolitionist Project
The Hedonistic Imperative
The Reproductive Revolution
Critique of Huxley's Brave New World

The Good Drug Guide
The Good Drug Guide

The Responsible Parent's Guide
To Healthy Mood Boosters For All The Family