Drugs That Induce Delirium
by
Karlsson I
Section of Psychiatry,
Institute of Clinical Neuroscience,
Goteborg University, Molndal, Sweden.
Biol Psychiatry 1999 Aug 1; 46(3):432-6


ABSTRACT

Drug-induced delirium is often seen in clinical practice. Most knowledge about delirium-inducing drugs comes from reports on side effects, and few systematic studies have been done in the field. Delirium is strongly associated with anticholinergic activity; drugs of different classes, including tricyclic antidepressants and traditional high-dose neuroleptics, constitute a high-risk group. A large number of drugs, including benzodiazepines, sedatives, dopamine-activating drugs, antiepileptics, histamine H2 receptor blockers, digitalis and analgesics, are less frequently associated with delirious reactions and constitute a medium-high-risk group. Some of these drugs do not have anticholinergic effects but in vitro have shown to bind to muscarine receptors. The risk of inducing delirium in frail elderly and demented persons clearly suggests that drugs which might induced delirium should be avoided.
TCAs
Dumb drugs
Smart drugs
Acetylcholine
Depressive-realism
Allergy and depression
Antidepressant toxicity
Scopolamine: structure
Acetylcholine: structure
Nootropics ('smart drugs')
Cholinergic-adrenegic axis
Cannabis and schizophrenia
Depression, decline and dementia
Antidepressant-induced hallucinations?
Scopolamine intoxication with burundanga in Colombia


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