Alcohol-induced euphoria: exclusion of serotonin
by
Morgan CJ, Badawy AA.
Cardiff and Vale NHS Trust,
Biomedical Research Laboratory,
Whitchurch Hospital, Cardiff CF14 7XB, UK.
Alcohol Alcohol. 2001 Jan-Feb;36(1):22-5.


ABSTRACT

During the first 30 min after acute ethanol consumption by three fasting normal male volunteers, no increase in circulating tryptophan availability to the brain occurred. On the contrary, a small decrease was observed, which became stronger subsequently. We conclude from this preliminary study that brain serotonin levels are not increased after alcohol intake by normal subjects and that, consequently, this indolylamine is unlikely to mediate the euphoric effects of alcohol.
Alcohol
Serotonin
Tianeptine
Topiramate
Barbiturates
Acamprosate
GABA and sleep
Benzodiazepines
Drugs for alcoholics
GHB and alcoholism
SSRIs and alcoholics
Alcohol and citalopram
Tianeptine and alcohol
Ethyl alcohol and suicide
Drug-induced cell suicide
Tryptophan and alcoholism
Alcohol, suicide and serotonin
Drink, drugs and sex in antiquity
Alcoholism, dopamine and the brain
Alcohol, alcoholism and GABA(A) receptors


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