Addiction
by
Robinson TE, Berridge KC.
Department of Psychology
(Biopsychology Program),
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48109-1109;
e-mail: ter@umich.edu berridge@umich.edu
Annu Rev Psychol. 2003;54(1):25-53. Epub 2002 Jun 10


ABSTRACT

The development of addiction involves a transition from casual to compulsive patterns of drug use. This transition to addiction is accompanied by many drug-induced changes in the brain and associated changes in psychological functions. In this article we present a critical analysis of the major theoretical explanations of how drug-induced alterations in psychological function might cause a transition to addiction. These include: (a) the traditional hedonic view that drug pleasure and subsequent unpleasant withdrawal symptoms are the chief causes of addiction; (b) the view that addiction is due to aberrant learning, especially the development of strong stimulus-response habits; (c) our incentive-sensitization view, which suggests that sensitization of a neural system that attributes incentive salience causes compulsive motivation or "wanting" to take addictive drugs; and (d) the idea that dysfunction of frontal cortical systems, which normally regulate decision making and inhibitory control over behavior, leads to impaired judgment and impulsivity in addicts.
Ibogaine
Morphine
Serotonin
Naloxone
Mescaline
Psychedelics
Cannabinoids
Benzodiazepines
Psychedelic honey
MAOIs and hallucinogens
Nexus, cathinone, BDB, and MDA
Ibogaine signals addiction gene products
18-methoxycoronaridine (18-MC) and addiction


Refs
and further reading

HOME
HedWeb
Nootropics
erythroxylum-coca.com
Future Opioids
BLTC Research
MDMA/Ecstasy
Superhapiness?
Utopian Surgery?
The Abolitionist Project
The Hedonistic Imperative
The Reproductive Revolution
Critique of Huxley's Brave New World

The Good Drug Guide
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The Responsible Parent's Guide
To Healthy Mood Boosters For All The Family