Bupropion and SSRI-induced side effects
by
Demyttenaere K, Jaspers L.
University Psychiatric Center KuLeuven,
Campus Gasthuisberg,
Herestraat 49, B3000 Leuven, Belgium.
J Psychopharmacol. 2008 Feb 28


ABSTRACT

Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are a first line treatment option for millions of patients, due to the positive balance between efficacy and tolerability. However, some side effects associated with their use, can impair quality of life and compliance with treatment. This paper reviews the prevalence of sexual dysfunction, weight gain and emotional detachment during SSRI treatment, the profile of bupropion for each of these events and the ability of bupropion to reverse them. Double-blind trials, open-label trials and anecdotical reports derived from Medline were included. First, there is robust evidence that SSRIs can induce sexual side effects and that bupropion causes less sexual dysfunction than SSRIs. There is limited, mainly open-label evidence that bupropion can reverse SSRI-induced sexual side effects. Second, there is good evidence that long-term treatment with some SSRIs can result in weight gain and that long-term treatment with bupropion can result in a small weight loss. There is only anecdotical evidence that bupropion can reverse SSRIinduced weight gain. Third, treatment with SSRIs has been associated with 'emotional detachment', although controversy exists about this concept. No data are available on the profile of bupropion for 'emotional detachment' or for the reversal of SSRI-induced 'emotional detachment' by bupropion-addition.

SSRIs
Bupropion
Bupropion.com
Bupropion and REM
Bupropion overdose
Bupropion and mania
Bupropion and seizures
Bupropion and smoking
Bupropion for dysthymia
Bupropion and depression
Bupropion versus trazodone
Bupropion versus paroxetine
Dopamine and sexual function
Bupropion and its metabolites
Sertraline for anxious depressives
Bupropion (Wellbutrin) : structure
Bupropion versus methylphenidate (Ritalin)
Bupropion for major depressive disorder (MDD)
Are commonly prescribed "new generation" antidepressants little better than placebos?
Selective publication of clinical trials leads to unrealistic estimates of antidepressant efficacy


Refs
and further reading

HOME
HedWeb
Nootropics
Cocaine.org
Future Opioids
BLTC Research
MDMA/Ecstasy
Superhapiness?
Utopian Surgery?
The Abolitionist Project
The Hedonistic Imperative
The Reproductive Revolution
Critique of Huxley's Brave New World

The Good Drug Guide
The Good Drug Guide

The Responsible Parent's Guide
To Healthy Mood Boosters For All The Family