The use of antidepressants to treat attention deficit
hyperactivity disorder in adults

by
Maidment ID.
Pharmacy Department,
Kent and Canterbury Hospital,
Ethelbert Road, Canterbury, UK.
ian.maidment@ekht.nhs.uk
J Psychopharmacol. 2003 Sep;17(3):332-6.


ABSTRACT

There is increasing evidence that children continue to experience attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms into adult life. The two main treatments for ADHD are antidepressants and stimulants. Here, the effectiveness data relating to the use of antidepressants in adults with ADHD are reviewed. Four controlled and six open studies were identified. Although, there is only limited data currently available, antidepressants may offer an effective therapy for adult ADHD. Controlled trials have studied desipramine, atomoxetine and bupropion, with most evidence supporting the efficacy of desipramine. The initial data indicate that atomoxetine is less effective than desipramine. The efficacy of bupropion is unclear. Initial published open data suggest a response rate of 50-78% with venlafaxine. Controlled studies are required to confirm this efficacy. Most of the present data are short-term, therefore long-term effectiveness data are required.
ADHD
Pemoline
Levodopa
Selegiline
Bupropion
Amineptine
Tomoxetine
Methylphenidate
Tomoxetine (Strattera) for ADHD
Ritalin, Adderall and Strattera for ADHD
Bupropion for ADHD and bipolar disorder
ADHD, amphetamine and the dopamine transporter


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